A good email management best practices can minimize email impact by up to 80% without affecting employees or the customers. When used appropriately, email is the ultimate useful communication tool. But many of us feel bored by the amount of mail that we receive and have to respond them. However, there are ways to manage your email so that you’re more productive. In this article, we will look for the strategies for doing this, so that you can get on with the real work at hand.
At the end of the day, email is just a tool for you to get your tasks done. Below are 5 effective tips to improve your email management:
1.  MAKE A DAILY SCHEDULE FOR EMAILING:

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Set a daily time slot to process your emails. 
If you don’t finish in the time slot try to continue in the next day. Prioritize the more important ones and let go of the rest.  
When I practices this HABIT it raised my productivity with a great extent. While I have urgent mail which require quick attention, the world does not end when I defer replying.
By restricting mail processing to a certain time frame, it has helped me prioritize the 30% important task in my life.

2. PRIORITIZE THE EMAILS


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Classify all emails according to their necessity, circle and share ability.
Not all emails are the same. 
We should love the 80:20 rule, because it applies to every single area of our lives. Including emails. 
80/20 rule is the idea that 20% of inputs are responsible for 80% of the outputs in any situation. 
Hence, to be effective, we should focus on 20% inputs that lead to 80% outputs. 

3. MINIMIZE THE “REPLLY ALL” STRATEGY


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When used correctly, the “Reply-to-All” button enables a user to provide relevant comments back to the original email author and other recipients listed in the TO: field. 
When used incorrectly, the Reply-to-All button can lead to an email storm that consumes storage and bandwidth.

4. FOR INSTANT AND COMMON EMAILING USE TEMPLATES


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If you look through your sent folder, you’ll probably find a trend in things you reply to. The mail I receive on my site can usually be classified in one of the few categories 
(a) Feedback / thank you mail 
(b) 1-1 coaching
(c) Requests for book/product reviews 
(d) Speaking inquiries 
(e) Others. 
As I reply, I would customize them accordingly to fit the needs of the original mail. This saved me huge amounts of time, compared to in the past when I would type emails from scratch.

5. AVOID READING OF NON-ESSENTIAL EMAILS


If you regularly receive email such as newsletters, blogs and article feeds, consider having them re-routed to another email address, or use rules, so that they’re instantly delivered to a particular folder.
This will help keep your primary inbox clear, and they’ll be in one place, ready to read at a convenient time.